Stamp Act
 By Carly

The Stamp Act was passed by the British Parliament in 1763. The purpose of the Stamp Act was to raise funds to support the British Army that was stationed in America. The money collected from the Stamp Act was also used to help pay for the troops they sent to America to defend and protect the American Frontier near the Appalachian mountains. They had over  10,000 troops stationed!  The Act stated that Americans must buy stamps for deeds, mortgages, liquor license, law licenses, playing cards, and almanacs. To be able to publish their articles, newspaper owners and publishers had to but stamps. The Stamp Act was very unpopular in the colonies. The Sons of Liberty, which usually meet under liberty trees, protested the stamp sales. The colonists slogan against the Stamp Act was, No Taxation Without Representation.The Virginia Assembly said that the Stamp act was illegal and unjust, and the Virginia Resolves passed it.The Massachusetts House of Representatives invited all of the colonies to talk over the matter. The colonies that accepted the invitation were New York, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Connecticut, Maryland, South Carolina, and Massachusetts. They met in New York in October of 1765. At the end of the meeting, they declared that stamp taxes could not be collected without the peoples consent. The American resistance forced the British Parliament to repeal the Stamp Act in 1766.



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Speidel, Tina . "Stamp Act Crisis images." The Stamp Act Crisis of 1765. History Department. 12 Feb 2008 <http://userwww.sfsu.edu/~cspeidel/index.htm>.

 Bearman, Alan. "Stamp Act." World Book Online Reference Center. 2008. [Internet]  4 Jan. 2008 <http://www.worldbookonline.com/wb/Article?id=ar528680>.

"A Summary of the 1765 Stamp Act." Colonial Williamsburg. 2008. The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. 15 Jan 2008 <http://www.history.org/History/teaching/tchcrsta.cfm>.



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